Epstein-Barr Virus


Introduction

 

Have you every wondered why we are gluten intolerant or have gluten ataxia while others can eat gluten without a problem?

Granted everybody has a different internal makeup because of what we put into our bodies and over time that becomes a problem, but what if there was another contributing factor.

Have you ever heard of the Epstein Barr Virus or EBV for short?

I only learned about this recently, but did you know that EBV is associated with different kinds of autoimmune diseases and even some cancers.

In this article, I am going to tell you about the Epstein Barr Virus and what causes it. I will also let you know about the symptoms one can experience and which foods to eat in order to help combat these.

In closing, I will give you some of my thoughts on the subject and if you choose, further reading on EBV.

 

What is Epstein-Barr

 

The Epstein-Barr Virus is a virus that is part of the herpes family and called the Human Herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4).

It is one of the most common viruses found in the human population and about 95% of all adults have been affected at some point in their lives.

Once infected unfortunately this virus remains in the body for the remainder of your life so even though your symptoms may have dissipated EBV lies dormant in you waiting for another opportunity to reactivate.

This may take months or even years and will depend on very stressful situations like a car accident or even a compromised immune system.

Although most symptoms are mild, in some situations they can become more serious depending on which organs and tissues in the body are affected.

 

Causes

 

The Epstein Barr Virus is mainly transmitted through the saliva of an infected person and to a lesser extent through their blood transfusions.

So this means that you could easily get infected just by kissing or even sharing foods and beverages with a person who has EBV.

Even healthy people who display no symptoms, but carry the virus can pass it on to others, therefore, it makes EBV very hard to control.

Ok, so that’s great, you can get EBV from the spread of saliva or blood, but where did the virus come from?

One hypothesis is that the virus came from the vaccinations we got as children. More specifically the Rubella or German Measles vaccine.

The Rubella vaccine was linked to the Epstein-Barr Virus by Dr. Mendelsohn MD in 1987 and was said that although the vaccine was given us as children it could linger in our systems for years afterward.

 

Symptoms of EBV

 

We are more likely to first contract Epstein Barr as children but may not display any symptoms other than the common cold. On the other hand, teenagers or young adults are more likely to display symptoms of “mono”.

These initially include fatigue, fever, rash, sore throat, swollen neck glands and loss of appetite, but if then reactivated after that first infection can become much more serious in some and cause unwanted symptoms.

Researchers have implicated many autoimmune disorders with EBV including lymphoma cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal cancer and even some stomach cancers.

It is said that most lymphomas in the intestinal tract are associated with EBV which include Irritable Bowl Syndrome, Crohns Disease, and Ulcerative Colitis.

The other autoimmune disorders that have been associated so far include Multiple Sclerosis, Lupus, Autoimmune Thyroiditis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Rheumatoid Arthritis and even some liver diseases.

Now here’s the kicker and some food for thought, EBV has even been associated with cerebellar ataxia. (I will leave a link on this below)

So as you can see the Epstein-Barr virus is something that has to be continuously kept under control.

 

Treatment

 

The key to keeping Epstein-Barr at bay is having a strong and healthy immune system. Research has shown that optimal Zinc levels in the body can withstand the oxidative stress that is caused by EBV.

Vitamins A, C, and D are also other nutrients that have been identified to boost the immune system and inhibit the activation of EBV.

Now, these nutrients can either be obtained through foods or supplements but my preference is to get them from foods as supplements often contain additional chemical makeups that don’t agree with me.

So, the foods that give us these nutrients are sweet potatoes, carrots, spinach and green leafy vegetables.

Also included are broccoli, brussel sprouts, and cauliflower, but remember if you ferment these vegetables you will be enhancing their nutritional makeup.

To add to the veggies above are papayas, strawberries, pineapple, oranges, pumpkin seeds and a bit of lamb or beef.

In the vitamin D department, you can have salmon, sardines or as in my case just do kefir and get plenty of sunshine.

 

Final thoughts

 

It seems like the Epstein-Barr Virus can be more unpredictable than originally thought and even though mainstream medicine downplays EBV activity, more serious links are being discovered all the time.

Because Epstein-Barr can embed itself within our healthy tissues and cause the immune system to attack the body. It makes you wonder if this virus is not the trigger for all immune conditions.

I think this is definitely an avenue worth exploring and even though I can’t find any association between gluten and EBV I feel they are somehow connected.

Below are a few links if you would like some further reading on the subject.

 

 

I hope you have found this article informative and I want to thank you for reading. If you have any questions or views on this topic please feel free to leave your comments below.

 

Cheers,

 

Brett

 

 

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